Tag: emotional intelligence (page 1 of 3)

Master Your EQ to Enhance Your Leadership Capabilities

EQ, or emotional intelligence, has become a popular topic among leaders and managers in recent years for good reason. While this skill was largely overlooked throughout the past several decades, it’s getting a much-needed resurgence while propelling effective leaders to new heights and creating unstoppable teams. 

Emotional intelligence is the ability to manage yourself and your relationships effectively and is closely linked with performance and success. Use the following tips to enhance your skills to more effectively lead your team to success. 

Be Self-Aware

Self-awareness is a crucial skill to have as a leader. You must be aware of your actions, how you come across to your team, and how you express yourself in certain situations. In addition to knowing how you will react to situations, you must be aware of what triggers your emotional responses. These aspects together can give you a clear picture of how to best control these actions to lead your team towards a healthier future instead of regressing. Be open to criticisms and use them as a basis to improve and develop your skills. 

Be Socially Aware

Social awareness involves a sensitivity to another person’s feelings and emotions as well as your own willingness to be respectful. With more knowledge about how other people may react, you can compose a professional response without batting an eye. If your company implements a new policy that may trigger a negative reaction within your team, you can prepare them in a way that is respectful, ensures their concerns are heard, and you can make the proper adjustments to maintain efficiency. 

Facilitate Collaboration

With a higher emotional intelligence, it’s possible to improve day-to-day interactions amongst those on your team. A higher EQ means you can manage larger teams more effectively by helping others work together and to motivate them to work harder in a way that inspires instead of threatens. The happier your team is the more it will show in their work. Once you prove the worth of your EQ to the team as a whole you can teach others to do the same to create a positive and productive workforce that truly values its employees. 

Tips on Recovering from Failure

When we think of leaders and successful people, we usually just picture them in their successes. Seldom do we think of their failures. Failure can cause emotional pain and embarrass us, but the silver lining of failure is that it is an opportunity to grow and enrich our lives both personally and professionally.

 

The first gift of failure is humility. Acknowledging a mistake and/or failure takes us to a place of vulnerability. Admitting to it is powerful and helps us to affirm that we want to do the correct thing, in the case of wrongdoing, or to do better if we fell short. Humility is also a reminder that as humans, we are social and need to rely on one another.  

 

Another gift of failure is compassion. Admitting to mistakes can be unbearably embarrassing, painful, even, but that embarrassment can increase our compassion for others. Research has shown that we tend to focus more on ourselves when we are successful and have achieved a higher status. The vulnerability of failure opens us up to connecting with others. Sally Blount, a contributor to Forbes, puts it best: “It turns out that engaging in the small joys and comaraderies of everyday life is one of the best ways to soothe a chastened ego.” 

 

One of the best ways to recover from failure is to keep an openness to learning. Many people find they learn best through experience, and that includes experiencing failure. Of course, this isn’t easy, as we tend towards safety and comfort. The combination of humility and compassion helps us learn and better connects us with others. While success may increase confidence, it is failure that builds wisdom. 

Four Ways to Apply Emotional Intelligence in Leadership

Emotional intelligence allows us to be more aware of our feelings and behaviors and those of others. Because of this, it’s an essential trait of strong leaders. Here are four ways emotional intelligence is an asset in the workplace.

 

Know Yourself

While the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of the term “emotional intelligence” may have to do with the ability to understand and empathize with others, it is critical first and foremost that you know yourself. A lack of self-awareness translates to a lack of capacity for growth; you must be conscious of your own strengths and worth as well as your own mistakes, flaws, and shortcomings. This will not only help you to understand which areas require your focus regarding growth but will affect how you navigate communicating and negotiating with others by being cognizant of your strengths and weaknesses.

 

Every Word Counts

People with emotional intelligence can use their intuition and what they know of their relationships with others to determine how they should approach different subjects with different individuals. Emotional intelligence allows for a gauge of different responses and how to calmly and effectively handle these responses. Besides knowing how to respond, people with emotional intelligence also know how to listen.

 

Control Your Emotions or They Will Control You

There’s much truth to be found in the timeless proverb, “Control your emotions, or they will control you.” This is especially true when conducting oneself as a leader. Once you can properly identify your emotions and standard responses to certain stimuli, you need to practice regulating them to prevent an accidental explosion. Being able to remain stoic and calm in a tense situation is important, but just as important is being able to process and release any negative emotions in a healthy way to avoid buildup.

 

Walk in Another Man’s Shoes

Emotionally intelligent people can pick up on cues, both verbal and nonverbal, that help them to understand how to interact with different people in different environments effectively. They can consider multiple perspectives and are thus skilled in authentically sympathizing. They have also learned to focus more on understanding than on hasty judgment. Because they understand viewpoints aside from their own, they can give more objective feedback. While ‘walking in another man’s shoes’ may not be possible in the literal sense, leaders who possess this tenet of emotional intelligence are valued for their abilities to listen and respond genuinely.

Leading Younger, Junior Employees to Excel

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3 Ways to Recognize Millennial Leaders in the Workplace

3 Ways to Recognize Millennial Leaders in the Workplace

3 Ways to Recognize Millennial Leaders in the Workplace

Members of the Millennial Generation are coming of age, joining the workforce and preparing to lead our society as we continue make progress in the 21st century. Millennials have entered corporate America at a great disadvantage in terms of economic adversity, diminished prosperity and political dissonance; thus far, however, they are holding their own.

The time has come to recognize Millennial leadership, and there is a lot to like in this regard. Millennials tend to embrace technology and diversity. They are also connected and in touch with social issues; they seek validation in relation to their opinions and are resourceful for the most part. Millennials enjoy lifelong learning processes and feel very comfortable working in teams.

Here are three observations that business owners and executives can apply for the purpose of recognizing future Millennial leaders:

1 – Spotting Quiet and Natural Born Leaders

Quiet and unassuming leaders have emerged throughout history mostly because their peers have sought their leadership. One of the keys to recognizing these quiet leaders is by taking into account their small accomplishments, which tend to be numerous. Another trait of these leaders is that they listen and read more than others; in the case of Millennials, who are known to be chatterboxes on social media, quiet leaders mostly take time to read updates and act upon them as necessary.

2 – Intelligent Feedback

For the most part, Millennials are not afraid of voicing their opinions on just about everything; this is part of their social process. For this reason, employers should provide their Millennial staff with tools such as Slack and Microsoft Teams, which combine the best of corporate communications with project management and social media features. Reviewing the feedback and messaging threads on these tools can help employers spot budding leaders by focusing on team members who provide constructive criticism, respond to every interaction, analyze with intent, and give praise when it is wise to do so.

3 – Assimilation of Corporate Culture

The norms and expectations of a business enterprise define its culture. Observing how Millennials navigate corporate culture can provide a glimpse into their leadership potential. Employees who seem to embrace corporate culture should be encouraged to participate in planning and operational meetings where they are invited to provide their personal input. If their ideas are in line with company culture, they may be ready to take on a more prominent business role with greater responsibilities.

5 Key Tips for Introverts In Leadership Positions

5 Key Tips for Introverts In Leadership Positions

3 Ways to Recognize Millennial Leaders in the Workplace

3 Ways to Recognize Millennial Leaders in the Workplace

5 Key Tips for Introverts In Leadership Positions

light bulbs

Our society has a habit of coveting and catering to the extrovert, leaving the introvert to feel less capable. But the truth is, some of the best thinkers throughout history were introverts. Introverts can be highly effective leaders. The reason introverts often feel they can’t lead is because some of the tips given for leadership don’t cater to them. Here are a few leadership tips for introverts:

1) Tell Your Team What to Expect

While introversion can be a positive quality in a leader, not all employees are used to it. It’s a good idea to let your team members know directly if you are going to do things differently than what they are used to. For example, if you don’t like having meetings as frequently as your team previously did, let your employees know that that’s how the team will be operating. Explain why you think it would be beneficial for you to spend more time on individual work. Let your employees know they can come to you with questions or concerns at any time.

2) Prepare For Meetings

Even if you intend to have fewer meetings that other leaders held, you’ll still want to have a few. If you aren’t prepared for these meetings, you can get overwhelmed and as a result communicate in a way that is not very effective. In order to make the meetings as productive as possible, get ready for the meetings before hard. Write down some thoughts or prepare an agenda. You can even create a presentation to help you stay on task.

3) Have One-on-One Meetings With Employees

If you don’t like having frequent team meetings, make sure you schedule one-on-one meetings with each member of your team. This is a beneficial way for introverted leaders to have effective communication with employees. This will allow you to get input from everyone on your team instead of just from the people who are likely to talk in meetings.

4) Listen First and Talk Second

One of the best leadership qualities associated with being an introvert is being a good listener. Too many people in the business world speak without listening, so introverts have a leg up on the competition in this regard. If you want to be viewed as a respected leader, put those listening skills to use. Actively listen to your employees, your coworkers and your clients. After processing what they have told you, provide guidance and answers that you feel will keep the company moving in the right direction.

5) Notice Your Employees’ Strengths

Chances are you’re not the only introvert on the team. You don’t want your employees to overlook your strengths, so make sure you don’t overlook the strengths of some of your employees who may be wary to socialize or share their thoughts. When you take the time to recognize the strengths of each team member, you will be more able to give them the right tasks. When you assign people the tasks they’ll do best, the company will be able to make more progress.

Being an introvert in the workplace can be tough, and it can be even more difficult when you’re in a leadership position. Don’t ever feel that your introversion makes you an incapable leader. If you follow the steps on this list, you’ll be able to lead your team to success.

 

The Importance of Improving Leadership

business leaders

Unfortunately, leadership development can sometimes be limited to only top level officials and positions, while many times this can actually create a level of stagnation for employees altogether.

The bottom line is that without a consistent training program that improves how leaders function in accordance with changing workflows, etc. Without a training program, some results can include employee satisfaction, turnover rate, and employees who simply do not want to engage further in the company.

Decreased employee engagement
A study conducted by Corporate Productivity found that half of managers across U.S. companies have to keep their best employees in their current positions (as a means to talent hoarding).

The most efficient of companies across the U.S. were more than twice as likely to prioritize the movement of talent to either different departments or moving upwards internally. On the other hand, companies with the lowest efficiency are 2.5 times more likely to prioritize other goals focused on talent movement or management.

When employees move on

Poor leaders also negatively affect talent management. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has also confirmed that solid leadership directly contributes to factors such as turnover and employee retention rate.

The lack of leadership training opportunities can cause employees to not only get bored, but also develop negative feelings towards the institution they work for. If employees don’t feel valued or believe there is an upward trajectory of job growth internally, the good employees will without a doubt find opportunities elsewhere.  

Many leaders are not “natural” and without proper training, there is a slim chance they will succeed. Investing in effective leadership programs to grow employees will have positive long term results for the company. Leaders at all levels need the right training to guide their employees to succeed in the workplace.